ABM ENDORSES FAIR COPYRIGHT IN RESEARCH WORKS ACT

NEW YORK, February 9, 2009 - American Business Media (ABM) endorsed HR 801, The Fair Copyright in Research Works Act, today to prevent the weakening of copyright in private sector research works. House Judiciary Committee Chairman, John Conyers (D-MI) introduced the legislation last week along with Representative Darrell Issa (R-CA), Representative Robert Wexler (D-FL), Representative Trent Franks (R-AZ) and Representative Stephen Cohen (D-TN).

“This is really common sense legislation to ensure that the federal government does not weaken copyrights for peer reviewed and scholarly articles and makes sure that investments in the editing, publishing, disseminating, peer review and archiving of these articles are protected,” said ABM President & CEO Gordon T. Hughes, II.

Each year, publishers invest hundreds of millions of dollars in journals and periodicals containing peer reviewed and scholarly articles.  While such works often report on research that has been partially or fully funded by the federal government, publishers invest significant resources to properly showcase the research that has been done and the conclusions that may have been reached. Copyright protections maintain the incentives for publishers to continue to invest in these journals and periodicals.

“ABM will be working diligently in the months ahead to see that this important legislation is passed into law. Our members simply can’t afford the erosion of copyright protections that have been afforded to research works for more than a century, not to mention the dangerous precedent that might be set if this law is not passed,” added Hughes.     

The Fair Copyright in Research Works Act was first introduced in the 110th Congress in response to a mandate from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) that requires copyrighted articles concerning NIH-funded research to be submitted to NIH twelve months after publication and to then be posted for free public consumption. The legislation ensures that no government agency is able to undermine copyright in this manner and will specifically prevent the federal government from diminishing copyright protections in cases where there has been funding from another entity or where there is value added by a third party not a party to the research grant agreement.

“I applaud Congressman Conyers and his colleagues for re-introducing this critical legislation. Assuring open access to research funded by tax payers is essential, but the NIH mandate could destroy the peer review process altogether and thus the quality and integrity of scientific research. There are better options to providing open access for taxpayers, making the NIH mandate unnecessary,” concluded Hughes.

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About American Business Media:
Founded in 1906, American Business Media is the association of business information providers, delivering business intelligence to industry professionals worldwide, including Madison Avenue, Wall Street and the Beltway. Its 300-plus member companies reach an audience of more than 100 million professionals and represent nearly 6,000 print and online titles and over 1,000 trade shows, with well over $26 billion in annual revenues.

 
abm - ABM
 

ABM ENDORSES FAIR COPYRIGHT IN RESEARCH WORKS ACT

NEW YORK, February 9, 2009 - American Business Media (ABM) endorsed HR 801, The Fair Copyright in Research Works Act, today to prevent the weakening of copyright in private sector research works. House Judiciary Committee Chairman, John Conyers (D-MI) introduced the legislation last week along with Representative Darrell Issa (R-CA), Representative Robert Wexler (D-FL), Representative Trent Franks (R-AZ) and Representative Stephen Cohen (D-TN).

“This is really common sense legislation to ensure that the federal government does not weaken copyrights for peer reviewed and scholarly articles and makes sure that investments in the editing, publishing, disseminating, peer review and archiving of these articles are protected,” said ABM President & CEO Gordon T. Hughes, II.

Each year, publishers invest hundreds of millions of dollars in journals and periodicals containing peer reviewed and scholarly articles.  While such works often report on research that has been partially or fully funded by the federal government, publishers invest significant resources to properly showcase the research that has been done and the conclusions that may have been reached. Copyright protections maintain the incentives for publishers to continue to invest in these journals and periodicals.

“ABM will be working diligently in the months ahead to see that this important legislation is passed into law. Our members simply can’t afford the erosion of copyright protections that have been afforded to research works for more than a century, not to mention the dangerous precedent that might be set if this law is not passed,” added Hughes.     

The Fair Copyright in Research Works Act was first introduced in the 110th Congress in response to a mandate from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) that requires copyrighted articles concerning NIH-funded research to be submitted to NIH twelve months after publication and to then be posted for free public consumption. The legislation ensures that no government agency is able to undermine copyright in this manner and will specifically prevent the federal government from diminishing copyright protections in cases where there has been funding from another entity or where there is value added by a third party not a party to the research grant agreement.

“I applaud Congressman Conyers and his colleagues for re-introducing this critical legislation. Assuring open access to research funded by tax payers is essential, but the NIH mandate could destroy the peer review process altogether and thus the quality and integrity of scientific research. There are better options to providing open access for taxpayers, making the NIH mandate unnecessary,” concluded Hughes.

***

About American Business Media:
Founded in 1906, American Business Media is the association of business information providers, delivering business intelligence to industry professionals worldwide, including Madison Avenue, Wall Street and the Beltway. Its 300-plus member companies reach an audience of more than 100 million professionals and represent nearly 6,000 print and online titles and over 1,000 trade shows, with well over $26 billion in annual revenues.